Meditate on This – Osho

Your last words at this morning’s discourse were ‘Meditate on this.’ What do you mean? How does one who only knows how to think about things learn to meditate on things?

Knowing what thinking is, is the beginning of knowing what meditation is. Thinking is the negative part; meditation is the positive part. Thinking means mind in turmoil; meditation means mind in silence. But the turmoil is the beginning of silence, and only after the storm there is silence.

If you can think, then you are capable of meditation. If a man can be ill, then he can be healthy. Health becomes impossible only when you cannot even be ill. Then you are dead. Only a corpse cannot fall ill. If you can fall ill, then there is still hope. Then you are still alive.

And so is the case with thinking and meditation. Thinking is mind which is ill–not at ease, not reconciled with itself, disturbed, fragmented, divided. Meditation means the division is no more, the fragments have disappeared into oneness–you are at ease, at home.

It is the same mind. Divided, it becomes thinking; undivided, it becomes meditation. If you can think, then you are capable of meditation, although meditation is not thinking. Thinking is an ill state of affairs, a pathology. But one can transcend it, and the transcendence is easy; it is not as difficult as you think. The difficulty comes because you don’t really want to go into meditation. Because in meditation not only is thinking going to disappear, you also are going to disappear. Only an ill man is, a healthy man disappears. In health you are not; you exist only in illness, you exist only in pain, in suffering, in hell. You can’t exist in heaven, because to feel one’s existence means to feel pain.

Have you ever not observed it? When you have a headache, then you have a head. When the headache disappears, the head disappears too. If your body is perfectly healthy and everything is running smoothly, humming smoothly, you don’t feel the body at all: you become bodiless. In the ancient Indian scriptures, health is described and defined as bodilessness: you don’t feel your body. How can you feel your body if it is not ill? Onlhy illness creates knowledge; self-consciousness is created by it, self is created by it.

So meditation is not difficult if you really want to go into it. It is the simplest thing possible–the most simple, the most primal. In your mother’s womb you were in meditation. There was no distracting thought; you were not thinking about anything, you simple were. To regain that state of womb is what meditation is all about. When you see a person meditating, what do you see? He has disappeared into the womb again, he has made his whole body like a womb and he has disappeared into it. Buddha sitting under the Bodhi Tree…what is he doing? He has moved back to the source. He is not there. There is nobody sitting under the Bodhi Tree. That’s waht a Buddha means: There is nobody sitting under the Bodhi Tree.

When Jesus goes to the mountains away from the multitude, where is he going? He is going inwards, he is trying to make contact again with the original source, because from that original source is rejuvenation. From that original source there is again freshness, vitality, and the waters of life are flowing again–one is bathed, one is resurrrected.

In the world thinking is needed.  In your inner being thinking is not needed.  When you are communicating with somebody, thought is a must.  When you are just communing with your self, what is the need of thought?  Thought will be a disturbance.

Try to understand why thinking is needed and what thinking is.  When there is a problem thinking is needed to solve it.  You have to go round about, look from every angle of the problem, think of all possible solutions.  And then there are many alternatives, so one has to choose which one is the right one.  And there is always the possibility of error, and there is always fear and anxiety–that is natural and still no guarantee that you are going to succeed in finding the solution.  One gropes in the darkness, one tries to find a way out of it.  Thinking is the confronting of a problem.  In life there are millions of problems, and thinking is needed.

I am not saying thinking is not needed.  But when you relate with the outside, it is needed.  But when you are facing your own being, it is not a problem, it is a mystery.  And let it be very clear what a mystery is.  A problem is something that can be solved; a mystery is something that cannot be solved by its very nature.  There is no way out of it, so there is no question of finding the way.

You are a mystery.  It is never going to be solved, because you annot go behind yourself, how can you solve it?  You cannot stand outside yourself and tackle yourself as a problem, so how can you solve it?  Who is going to solve whom?  You are the solver, and you are the problem, and you are the solution.  There is no division at all.  The knower and the known and the knowledge are one–this is the mystery.

When the knower is different from the known, then there is a problem.  Then there is something objective there.  You can think of a way out, you can find out something which becomes knowledge.  But inside yourself you are facing the eternal–the beginningless, the endless–you are facing the ultimate.  You cannot think.  If you think you will miss.  Only through non-thinking you will not miss.  You can only see into it–with awe, with great wonder.  You can go into it deeper and deeper, you can dive into it.  You can go on digging, and the more you dig, the more you will understand that this is a mystery to be lived not a problem to be solved.  So thinking is irrelevant .  And when thinking is irrelevant, there arises meditation.

The failure of thinking is the arousal of mediation.

Science is thinking, religion is meditation.  If you think about God, it is philosophy, it is not religion.  If you live God, then it is religion.

If you are looking at a lotus flower and thinking about it, then it is science, philosophy, aesthetics.  But if you are simply looking at the lotus flower. . .the look is pure, uncontaminated by any thought, and the lotus flower is not thought to be a problem but just a beauty to be experienced . . . you are there, the lotus flower is there, and there is nothing in between–just empty, nobody is standing between you and the flower–it is meditation.  Then the flower is not outside you, because there is nothing to divide as the in and the out.  Then the lotus flower is somehow within you and you are somehow within the lotus flower.  You melt into each other; divisions are lost, boundaries become blurred.  The lotus starts touching your heart, and your heart starts touching the lotus.  There is communion.  It is meditation.

Whenever thought is not functioning, it is meditation.  Listening to me, sometimes it becomes meditation to you.  I say ‘sometimes’ because sometimes you start thinking and then you lose track.  When you are just listening, not thinking at all about  what is being said–neither for nor against, not comparing with your past knowledge, not tbeing greedy to accumulate it for your future use, not trying to justify, rationalise, not doing anything at all . . .I am here, you are there, and there is a meeting.  In that meeting is mediatation.  And then there is great beauty.

You ask me:  Your last words at this morning’s discourse were ‘Meditate on this.’

Yes.  Whether I say it or not, that is my message every day, in the beginning, in the middle, in the end–that’s what I am saying:  Meditate on this.  Meditate.

The English word ‘meditation’ is not very adequate for what we mean by dhyana is the East; ‘meditation’ again carries some idea of thinking.  In English, ‘meditation’ means to think about, to meditate upon something.  Dhyana does not mean to meditate upon something.  Dhyana simply means to be in the presence of something, just to be in the presence.  If you are in the presence of a tree, it is meditation on the tree.  If you are in the presence of the stars, then it is meditation on the stars.  If you are in the presence of me, then it is a meditation.  And when you are alone, and you feel your own presence, that is mediation.

From dhyana came the Chinese word ch’an; from ch’an came the Japanese word zen.  They are all derivations of dhyanaDhyana is a beautiful word. It is not translatable into English, because English has words like ‘meditation’, ‘contemplation’, ‘concentration’–they all miss the point.

‘Concentration’ means concentrating on one thing.  Meditation is not a concentration, it is an absolutely de-concentrated state of consciousness–it is just the opposite.  When you concentrate there is a tension, you start focusing, there is effort.  And when you concentrate on one thing then other things are denied, then you are closed for other things.  If you concentrate on me, then what will you do with this plane passing by, and the noise?  Then you will close your mind to it, you will focus on me, you will become strained because you have to deny this roaring aeroplane.  A bird starts singing–what will you do?  You will have to close yourself.  That’s what is being taught in the schools and the colleges and the universities.  It is concentration.

Meditation is not concentration, it is just openness, alertness, presence.  You are listening to me, but your are not listening to me exclusively.  You are simply listeneing.  And the aeroplane goes roaring by–you listen to that too.  And the bird starts singing, and you listen to that too.  And there is no division; you don’t choose.   All that happens in the surroundings is accepted: it becomes part of your listening to me.  Your listening is not exclusive, it is inclusive of all.

So concentration is not meditation.  Then the word ‘meditation’ itself is not meditation, because in meditation somebody meditates on Jesus, somebody meditates on the Bible, somebody meditates on God.  Again it is not meditation.  If there is a God as an object and Jesus as an object, then there is a distinction between the knower and the known:  there is duality.  And in duality there is conflict, and in conflict there is misery.  In non-duality conflict disappears; and when conflict disappears, hell disappears.  Then there is joy.

So meditation is not ‘meditating upon something’, meditation simply means a different quality of your inner being. In thinking your mind goes on weaving, spinning thoughts. In meditation your mind is simply silent, utterly silent, not doing anything at all–not even meditation! Not doing anything at all. Sitting silently, doing nothing…and the grass grows by itself. The spring comes, and the grass grows by itself.  Meditation is a natural state of silence. It is not contemplation either.

In contemplation you think about ‘high thoughts’, spiritual things–not mundane things, not about the market, not about the family, but high values, truth, beauty, bliss. But you contemplate on these. You try to think about these high values of life, then it is contemplation.

But meditation is not even that. Meditation is a state of stillness. And this state of stillness has not to be forced, because it cannot be forced. If you force it, it will not be the right stillness. If you force it, you will be there forcing it; it will not be natural, it will not be spontaneous. So what has to be done?

One has to understand the ways of thinking. One has to understand the stupidity of thinking. One has to understand that thinking creates conflict, division, struggle, that thinking fragments you, that in thinking you start falling apart. One has to see what thinking does to you. In that very seeing arises meditation. In that very understanding, suddenly you feel breezes of silence coming to you. For a moment everything becomes still, utterly still, a standstill. And the taste of it will bring more of it. And by and by you will know the knack of it. Meditation is a knack. It is not science, it is not even art, it is a knack. You have to learn it slowly, slowly, through your own experience. So when I say ‘Meditate on this’ I mean don’t think upon it. Just close your eyes, be in silence. Let it be there.

For example, Jesus’ story: Jesus and the woman of Samaria are standing at that well, Jacob’s well, and Jesus is asking ‘Give me some water to drink’–the dialogue that ensues, just let it be there.

And you be utterly silent in front of this parable. Let this parable be like a lotus flower; it is. Just let it be there, throbbing, pulsating with a beating heart. Let it become alive in front of you, and then become silent. What can you do? You can only be silent. Let this drama be enacted in front of you. In deep silence you see it, and that will reveal to you the meaning of it. And that will reveal to you all the dialogues that have happened between any enlightened person and the disciple. And it will become not only a Jesus parable, it become a parable between you and me too.

It is happening every day. That’s what I mean when I say ‘Meditate upon this.’

-Osho

From I Say Unto You, Vol. 1, Chapter Ten

Copyright© OSHO International Foundation

An MP3 audio file of this discourse can be downloaded from Osho.com, or you can read the entire book online at the Osho Library.

Many of Osho’s books are available online from Amazon.com and in the U.S. from OshoStore-Sedona and Osho Here and Now.

I AM is the Gate – Osho

This is a follow-up to the last post – Jesus was a Buddha.

Osho addresses the often quoted statement by Jesus.

Jesus saith unto him, I AM the way, the Truth, and the Life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by Me.

This statement is of immense importance, and has been tremendously misunderstood by Christians, misinterpreted. This statement has become a protection for the priest, for the dogmatist, for the demagogue. Christians have taken it to mean that nobody ever comes to God unless he comes through Christ – that means Jesus, son of Mariam. Nobody comes to God unless he comes through Jesus. They have meant, or they have interpreted it in such a way, that Christianity becomes the only right religion. All other religions become wrong. All other religions are against God – only Christianity.

Jesus saith unto him, I AM the way, the Truth, and the Life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by Me.

What does he mean? These priests and the missionaries and the Christians who go on converting the whole world to Christianity, are they right? Is their interpretation right? Or has Jesus something else? He has something UTTERLY else.

In the Bhagavad Gita also there is a statement which Hindus go on misinterpreting. Krishna has said to Arjuna… And almost the same quality of closeness existed between Arjuna and Krishna as between Jesus and Thomas – the same relationship. And the same flowering had happened, and the same statement had bubbled up out of that relationship. Krishna said to Arjuna: SARVA DHARMAN PARITYAJYA MAMEKAM SHARANAM VRAJA: Drop all religions, forget about all religions and come to my feet, because it is only through me that one reaches to God.

Now Hindus are happy with this statement. Krishna has said so clearly: Forget all religions. Drop all kinds of other religions and hold unto me. Hold to my feet – MAMEKAM SHARANAM VRAJA. Come to my feet; they are the bridges to God – the only bridges.

Both statements happened in the same kind of situation. Arjuna must have been very very close when Krishna said this. And so is the case with Thomas – he must have been very close. Christ must have been showering like flowers on Thomas when he said this. You will need that loving understanding of a Thomas, only then will you be able to understand the meaning of this. You will need that loving intimacy of an Arjuna, only then will you be able to understand the statement of Krishna. Both are the same, both mean the same – and both have been misinterpreted.

The misinterpretation comes from the priest and the politician – those who try to convert religion into organisational, political strategies.

Jesus saith unto him, I AM the way

I AM… That has to be understood. It does not mean Jesus, it simply means the inner consciousness: ’I am’ – the inner life. This consciousness inside you, which you call ’I am’, this ’I am’ is the only way. If you can understand this ’I am’, what it is, what this consciousness is, you have found the way. It has nothing to do with Jesus, it has nothing to do with Krishna. When I say to you ’I am the gate’ it has nothing to do with me! That I AM is the gate. The gate is within you, the way is within you, the truth is within you. You have to understand who this is calling himself ’I am’ within you, what this consciousness is, what it consists of.

If you can go into your consciousness, if you can feel, see, realise the nature of your consciousness, that is the way. Meditation is the way – not Christ, not Krishna, nor Mohammed. Who am I? – this question will become the way.

Raman Maharshi is right when he says that only one question is relevant: Who am I? Go on asking this question, let this question become a fire in you. Be aflame with it! Let every cell of your body and your being, and every fibre of your existence pulsate, vibrate with it. And let this question arise from the deepest core: Who am I? And go on asking; don’t accept any answer that is given by the mind. You have been reading the Upanishads, and in the Upanishads they say ’You are God’. And your mind will say ’Why are you asking again and again? I know the answer: You are God. And keep quiet!’ Or if you are a Christian and have been reading the Bible again and again, you know: The kingdom of God is within you. So, ’Who am I?’ – ’The kingdom of God. Now keep quiet!’

No answer from the head has to be accepted. No answer from the.memory has to be accepted. No answer from knowledge has to be accepted. All answers have to be thrown in the whirlwind of the question ’Who am I?’ A moment comes when all answers have gone and ONLY the question remains, alone like a pillar of fire. You are afire with it! You are just a thirst, a passionate quest: ’Who am l?’ When the question has burned all the answers, then the question burns itself too, it consumes itself. And once the question has also disappeared, there is silence. That silence is the answer. And that is the door, the gate, the way, the truth.

Please be careful. When Jesus says I AM THE WAY, he means the one who calls himself I AM within you is the way. It has nothing to do with Jesus. Just by holding the feet of Jesus you are not going to go anywhere. Just by praying to Jesus you are not going to go anywhere. Listen to what he is saying.

Each Master throws you back to yourself, because ultimately God is hidden in you as much as in the Master. You are carrying your light within yourself. You just have to turn back, you have to look inwards.

I AM the way, the Truth

Yes. In your very consciousness is the truth. When you become fully conscious you become the full truth. When you are absolutely conscious, it is not that you face truth as an object, you ARE the truth, it is your subjectivity, it is you. That’s what Upanishads say: TATWAMASI: Thou art that.

…… and the Life…

Three things Jesus says: It is the life – I AM, consciousness, awareness. This is life – the life that you know, the ordinary life. Then the second: I AM THE WAY – the way that joins the ordinary life with the extraordinary life, the way that joins Adam with Christ, the way that joins body with soul. And the third thing: I AM THE TRUTH. Jesus has said all the three things.

You are that right now, because I AM THE LIFE. And you have the way too, hidden behind you, within you: I AM THE WAY. And you are the ultimate goal too, the destiny. You are the beginning and the middle and the end. You are Adam, Jesus and Christ.

no man cometh unto the Father, but by Me.

No man has ever entered into God unless he has entered into his consciousness, until he has entered into his ’I am’-ness. This is the meaning. This is the meaning of Krishna, and this is the meaning of Christ. This is the meaning of all the Masters.

Osho

From I Say Unto You, Vol. 2., Chapter Nine

Copyright© OSHO International Foundation

An MP3 audio file of this discourse can be downloaded from Osho.com, or you can read the entire book online at the Osho Library.

Many of Osho’s books are available online from Amazon.com and in the U.S. from OshoStore-Sedona and Osho Here and Now.

 

See Jesus Was A Buddha here

Jesus was a Buddha

Jesus was a Buddha and Gautama was a Christ. Both of these enlightened masters were speaking from the same Ultimate Reality. And yet within the teachings of Christianity there seems to be such a narrow teaching that Jesus is the only way.

It seems that much of the conflict between Christianity and other religions stems from a couple of sayings attributed to Jesus. What if we just got the translation wrong or they were not fully understood when they were spoken.

Certainly one of the most repeated is quoted in John 14:6, “I am the way, the truth and the life.” And following that, and in Christians eyes makes it clear that Jesus is the only way, “No man cometh unto the Father but by Me.”

This statement can be looked at from a higher vision, from an unlimiting consciousness rather than the common narrow interpretation. Rather than “I am the way”, we could say “I AM is the Way, I AM is the truth and the Life.” What a difference is made by just adding “is.” Looked at from this light it is easier to understand the statement of Jesus from John 8:58, “I say unto you, before Abraham was, I am.”In fact it is the only way that the sentence makes sense. I AM is the ultimate subject, first person, singular which each of us at our very core are. It is this “I AM” that we have to return to in order to reach the Father.

-purushottama

This post is from a collection of essays, stories, insights and poems that have occurred to me along the Way titled Here to Now and Behind.

Franklin Merrell-Wolff addresses this issue in chapter seven of his Philosophy of Consciousness Without an Object. The chapter is titled Jesus and the Way which can be seen at:   https://pgoodnight.wordpress.com/2009/12/08/jesus-and-the-way/

Helping Others

To be able to help others we must first help ourselves. Most everyone would agree with this statement. But if we look a little deeper we find that we often engage in helping others as a means to avoid doing the inner work on ourselves. It is a way to avoid that work and still feel good about ourselves.

Ouspensky in his In Search of the Miraculous quotes George Gurdjieff as saying:

“In order to be able to help people one must first learn to help oneself. A great number of people become absorbed in thought and feelings about helping others simply out of laziness. They are too lazy to work on themselves; and at the same time it is very pleasant for them to think about that they are able to help others. This is being false and insincere with oneself. If a man looks at himself as he really is, he will not begin to think of helping other people: he will be ashamed to think about it.”

-purushottama

This post is from a collection of essays, stories, insights and poems that have occurred to me along the Way titled Here to Now and Behind.

Love is Being – Osho

We have been taught continually that love is a relationship, so we have become accustomed to that idea. But that is not true. That is the lowest kind – very polluted.

Love is a state of Being.

– Osho

from Gold Nuggets.

Love is All-one-ness

Love is the language of All-one-ness

Love means one, only one. No other. Not two. All Oneness. Aloneness.

Love is Oneness. Not a relationship. A relationship can only be with more than one.

Two people can be In love, but cannot love each other. To love another implies separateness.

Love is not separateness – it is oneness.

It is not that I Love – I Am love.

Love is all there is.

Love

-purushottama

This post is from a collection of essays, stories, insights and poems that have occurred to me along the Way titled Here to Now and Behind.

Going Inside Means Staying Home

When we say to go inside, it is really a misnomer. First there is no going. Second there is neither an inside nor an outside.

What we are really indicating is to stop going. Normally we are constantly projecting. When a thought crosses our space we project ourselves onto that thought and run with it.

Once we break that association we are able to see a thought appear and at the same time there is space and we are aware that we are not that thought. It is an appearance. By staying home the thought scampers off to find another suitor.

The “practice” consists of this remembering and breaking the habit, the automaton that is our usual way of being. This in turn frees up energy that is normally consumed constantly. It also keeps from wearing out the mental mechanism which is not designed to be running constantly. Then when it is needed for daily functions it is fresh, rested and ready to respond.

-purushottama

This post is from a collection of essays, stories, insights and poems that have occurred to me along the Way titled Here to Now and Behind.